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Inside of the Cathedral of Seville

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The Cathedral of Seville is built on the old aljama mosque of the city, this shows the power that one culture exercises over another when it is conquered. This fact makes its plan different, facing Mecca and not Jerusalem, that is, facing south instead of east. It should be clarified that Mecca is oriented at 10o from Seville and not at 86o as the old mosque is oriented, this is due to the fact that in Al-Andalus the mosques had to be oriented towards the south quadrant and not towards the east, as the Christian churches did.

When the Cathedral Chapter commissioned the design of the Gothic Cathedral, it stated verbatim that it wanted a Cathedral that everyone who saw it would take for crazy. For this, 5 naves were created that covered the 116 by 76 meter rectangle occupied by the Almohad mosque, this results, unlike what was usual in the great European Gothic Cathedrals, a hall plan with a Latin cross marked in height and in width by the central naves and the transept. This hall plan also results in the absence of an ambulatory at the head, which ends in a straight line like the wall of the old mosque. Later the Royal Chapel would be added, which is a Renaissance apse, but it does not really correspond to the Gothic company.

In the naves of the Gospel and the Epistle, which are the lateral naves, there are many chapels. The 60 pillars support 68 ogive vaults, highlighting those of the transept and central nave with their star shapes. Instead of placing a clerestory, a continuous balcony was chosen along the main nave in order to be able to wander around the temple without being seen. Located in the central nave, in order from the feet, are the Retrochoir, the Choir, with two organs, the Transept, the Main Altar, the Back of Altar and the Royal Chapel.

Main Chapel

It is the main chapel of the temple. Located in the central nave, immediately after the transept, it is closed by a metal fence and an altarpiece, which is the largest in the Christian world with a height of almost 25 meters and an area of 400 square metres. Designed by the Flemish sculptor Dancart at the end of the 15th century, it consists of a bench, four horizontal sections and seven vertical sections. Several renowned sculptors were involved in its creation, including Roque Balduque, Jorge Fernández Alemán and Juan Bautista Vázquez “the Old”, who finished it 80 years later.

With more than 40 reliefs and 200 sculptures, it was known as the “Golden Bible”, and has an extensive iconography that covers the life of Christ and the Virgin, scenes from the New Testament, even from apocryphal gospels. In this extensive iconographic program, which our guides will comment on in detail, we must highlight El Cristo del Millón, which owes its name to the millions of thanks it receives despite being in the highest part of the altarpiece, and La Virgen de la Sede, located in the central part of the bank and which gives its name to the Cathedral.

It is amazing that a work of this size has survived, among others, a fire in the 17th century and two earthquakes, one in the 16th century and the other in the 19th century.

The beautiful ironwork that closes the Main Chapel dates from the 16th century. The sides were finished by Diego de Huidobro and Juan de Conillana, and the front is the work of Francisco de Salamanca, who also made the pulpits.

Coroy Órganos Catedral de Sevilla

Choir

The Choir is a fundamental place in the spatial and functional conception of a Cathedral and its origin responds to a tradition linked to the Paleo-Christian basilicas, specifically in the “schola cantorum”. It is usual for the Choir to face the High Altar so that the liturgy can be followed. To this we must add that the cathedral clergy has altar and choir services as fundamental obligations, therefore, the Choir is an essential part, to the point that if there is no Choir there is no Cathedral.

The Choir is accessed through a Renaissance grille from the first half of the 16th century, completed by Francisco de Salamanca. The seats, made of different types of wood and where several authors took part, are from the beginning of the 16th century and have a magnificent sculptural and iconographic program. It should be noted that the 117 seat backs have completely different decorations, made with inlays based on Mudejar lacework. This type of Mudejar adornment in the Choir is only found in the Cathedral of Puebla in Mexico, where the influence of the Cathedral of Seville in New Spain is again evident.

In the center, a large Renaissance lectern, carved in wood, which was used to place the huge liturgical chant books. Dating from the second half of the 16th century, it was made, among others, by Juan Bautista Vázquez “the Old”, who also masterfully carved the Virgin with Child, who presides over the lectern.

Trasaltar Catedral de Sevilla

Back of altar

In the wall that closes the High Altar, opposite the Royal Chapel, is the trasaltar. It has a composition of 59 statues of kings, bishops and saints, which on corbels and under canopies, make up a sculptural altarpiece of great beauty. These works were made in the 16th century by various authors and cover Gothic, Renaissance and Mannerist styles.

At that time there was a devotion in Seville around pregnant women who asked La Virgen del Reposo to have a good birth. This devotion was of such faith that in the middle of the 16th century the Sevillian nobility ordered the construction of a niche for the Virgen del Reposo to preside over the Back of Altar. Attributed to Miguel Perrín, and due to this devotion, it was known by Sevillians as “Señora del Bienpariese”.

Also noteworthy is the chapel located at the foot of the wall, which serves as a burial place, and which is dedicated to Our Lady of the Soterraño.

It has a composition of 59 statues of kings, bishops and saints, which on corbels and under canopies, make up a sculptural altarpiece of great beauty.

Organ

In the “Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy”, during the Second Vatican Council, it is ruled that “the pipe organ be held in great esteem, … whose sound can bring remarkable splendor to ecclesiastical ceremonies and powerfully lift souls towards God and to heavenly realities”.

The organ of the Cathedral of Seville is made up of two instruments located in two pieces of furniture (18th century) and that sound from a single console, made up of four keyboards and one pedalboard (from 1901-1903). The left organ was destroyed in 1888 by an earthquake and due to this fact the organ builder Aquilino Amezua rebuilt it. And a novel electrical connection was made in 1973. The sculptures of Duque Cornejo stand out, in the eighteenth-century furniture of Luis de Vilches.

At the end of the 20th century, Gerhard Grenzing was entrusted with a restoration in several phases, sponsored by the Real Maestranza de Caballería de Sevilla. Listening to the organ of the Cathedral with the acoustics provided by the temple, under the sky of vaults and domes, observing the magnificence of the Gothic pillars and the grandeur of the architectural construction is a sensory experience that moves all visitors.

Organo Catedral de Sevilla

Alabaster Chapels

Surrounding the Choir on the outside is the Retrochoir and the Alabaster Chapels, so named because they are built with this material and which support the organs, highlighting the architectural importance of the Choir within the Cathedral of Seville. The Retrochoir, from the 17th century, was made by Miguel de Zumárraga, the chapels were finished by Diego de Riaño in the middle of the 16th century and there are four of them. If we look at the Choir, to the right side are the Chapel of Saint Gregory and the Virgin of the Star, and to the left the Chapel of the Immaculate and the Incarnation.

Due to the amount of historical-artistic details of these spaces, it is advisable to visit with our guides who will give complete information on all the details.

Capilla de San Gregorio

Chapel of Saint Gregory

  • Advocation: Saint Gregory, the work of Manuel Garcíaa de Santiago (mid-18th century).
  • Altarpiece: Renaissance, made by Nicolás de León (S.XVI).
  • Gate: Marcos de la Cruz (mid-s.XVII).
Capilla de la Virgen de la Estrella

Chapel of the Virgin of the Star

  • Chaplaincy carried out by Pedro Franco (second half of the 16th century).
  • Advocation: Virgin of the Star, attributed to Nicolás de León (S.XVI).
  • Altarpiece: Rococo made by Jerónimo Franco (second half of the 18th century). Gate: Pedro Delgado (S.XVI).
El Trascoro de la Catedral

Retrochoir

Design: Made by Miguel de Zumárraga (second half of the 17th century) in marble and jasper. Two large doors lead to the choir and two small ones give access to the organ stands.

Paintings: Presiding over the altar is the Virgin of Remedies, a Gothic painting dated around 1400. Below, Saint Ferdinand entering Seville, by Francisco Pacheco (17th century).

El Trascoro de la Catedral del Sevilla
Capilla Inmaculada

Chapel of the Immaculate

  • Dedication: Immaculate, by Martínez Montañés (first half of the 17th century). She is known as La Cieguita (the little blind girl). Conceived according to the model that he presented in one of his treatises and full of symbology, Martínez Montañés was aware that he had produced one of his best works, as he justified by handing it over after a three-year delay.
  • Altarpiece: Mannerism, made by Martínez Montañés (first half of the 17th century).
  • Painting: Francisco Gutiérrez de Molina and Jerónima Zamudio, patrons of the chapel, painted by Francisco Pacheco (17th century).
  • Gate: Baroque (S.XVII).
Capilla de la Encarnacion

Chapel of the Incarnation

  • Patrons: Juan Serón and Antonia Verastegui. (S.XVII).
  • Dedication: Relief in wood with a scene of The Annunciation, sculpted by Francisco de Ocampo (first half of the 17th century).
  • Altarpiece: Baroque, made in alabaster by Francisco de Ocampo (first half of the 17th century).
  • Gate: Baroque (S.XVII).

East side chapels and altars

The chapels of the Cathedral of Seville house countless treasures, anecdotes and stories that our guides explain in an entertaining and effective way. We expose here a small structure of the chapels, with some essential data, that visitors will be able to see in our tours of the chapels. From left to right, facing the east wall they meet.
Capilla de San Pedro

Chapel of Saint Peter

Behind a grille from the end of the 18th century made by Fray José Cordero de Torres, there is a rich artistic and iconographic program. The mausoleum of Bishop Diego de Deza stands out, the altarpiece dedicated to Saint Peter that was commissioned by the Marquises of Malagón to the artist Diego López Bueno in the 17th century, and his paintings were made by Francisco de Zurbarán in that same century, especially a beautiful Immaculate Conception stands out.

His paintings were made by Francisco de Zurbarán in that same century, especially a beautiful Immaculate Conception stands out.

Historia Religiosa de la Catedral de Sevilla

Royal chapel

It is Renaissance in style and was made by Hernán Ruiz II in the second half of the 16th century. It functions as the head of the Cathedral and has a hemispherical dome that covers a square space that ends in a semicircular apse flanked by two chapels. Guarding the 17th century altarpiece is the Gothic sculpture of the Virgen de los Reyes, patron saint of the archdiocese and the city of Seville.

In a magnificent baroque silver urn, work of Juan Laureano de Pina, lies King San Fernando, together with several royal tombs, among which that of Pedro I of Castile stands out. Also noteworthy is the altar of the Virgen de las Batallas, an ivory carving from the 13th century.

Altar Santa María Magdalena

Altar of the
Magdalena

Burial chapel of the Pedro García de Villadiego (17th century). It has an altarpiece with anonymous paintings where the main scene is the appearance of Christ to the Magdalena.
Altar de la Asunción

Altar of the
Assumption

One of the two chapels dedicated to the Assumption that exists in the Cathedral. Sponsored by Juan Cristóbal de la Puebla, in the 16th century, the altarpiece has an anonymous relief of the Virgin of the Assumption. The paintings were made by Alonso Vázquez, from the 16th century.
Santa Justa y Rufina

Altar of Santa Justa and Rufina

Patronage of the Bécquer brothers. The Santa Justa and Rufina sculptures are the work of Duque Cornejo in the 18th century and are processional on the Corpus Christi festival, a Catholic festival that celebrates the Eucharist and takes place 60 days after Easter Sunday.

Capilla de la Concepcion

Chapel of the Conception

It was the primitive burial of the knights who conquered Seville together with King Fernando III “the Saint”, the patron saint of Seville from the middle of the 17th century. Gonzalo Núñez de Sepúlveda was one of these gentlemen, that is why the Sepúlveda family’s coat of arms appears on their sepulchral slab, according to the design of Valdés Leal, and on the grille of this chapel. Also from the 17th century is the magnificent Baroque altarpiece decorated with Solomonic columns that was made by Martín Moreno and the images by Alonso Martínez, with the exception of the Crucified Saint Paul. To the right is the neo-Gothic tomb (18th century) of Archbishop Francisco Javier Cienfuegos Jovellanos.

Santa Barbara

Altar of Santa Bárbara

The most remarkable thing is the painting by Miguel de Esquivel, made in the first quarter of the 17th century, which represents Santa Justa and Rufina in their most usual representation since the 16th century, accompanying the Giralda. These saints supposedly protected the tower during the earthquake of 1504 and that prevented it from collapsing.

The most remarkable thing is the painting by Miguel de Esquivel, made in the first quarter of the 17th century.

South side chapels, altars and rooms

The chapels of the Cathedral of Seville house countless treasures, anecdotes and stories that our guides explain in an entertaining and effective way. We present here a small structure of the chapels, with some essential information, that visitors will be able to see in our tours of the chapels. From left to right facing the south wall, and separated into two blocks by the San Cristóbal gate, they find each other.
Sala de Ornamentos

Hall of Ornaments

You pass the old accounting office through a door by Hernán Ruiz II in the 16th century. The sculptural representation of Saint Joseph by Pedro Roldán stands out (mid-17th century).
Capilla del Mariscal

Marshal’s Chapel

Sponsored by the Marshal of the Island of Hispaniola, Diego Caballero, it has a Renaissance altarpiece from the mid-16th century that is considered a jewel of this style. It is the work of Pedro Campaña, with sculptures by Pedro Becerril and polychromes by Antonio de Arfián. Among the extensive iconography, the Purification of the Virgin stands out, in the center, the Resurrection and Calvary.
Stained glass window: The betrothal of the Virgin and Saint Joseph by Arnao de Flandes (mid-16th century).

Antesala del Cabildo

Ante-Council

This room was conceived as the place where the Cathedral was administered, the Renaissance vault was finished by Asensio de Maeda (16th century). Lecterns and a magnificent collection of codices and choir books are exhibited.
Cúpula de la Sala Capitular

Chapter House

After the intervention of several architects under the design of Diego de Riaño, it was finished by Asensio de Maeda (mid-16th century). With an elliptical plan according to the meeting needs of the Cathedral Chapter, it was covered by a beautiful dome where the eight Sevillian saints and the Immaculate Conception stand out, all made by Murillo (17th century). Also noteworthy:

  •  The religious virtues and allegories, eight paintings by Pablo de Céspedes (late 16th century) that are above the wall.
  • The semicircular reliefs with varied iconography of Juan Bautista Vázquez “El Viejo” (second half of the 16th century).
  • The eight rectangular reliefs by Marcos Cabrera (late 16th century) also with varied iconography.

With an elliptical plan according to the meeting needs of the Cathedral Chapter

Sacristía Mayor

Main Sacristy

It is one of the most beautiful spaces of the Spanish Renaissance, finished by Martín de Gaínza under the design of Diego de Riaño (16th century). On the front of the Sacristy, The Descent, painting on panel by Pedro de Campaña (mid-16th century). Among the most relevant works are:

  • Large silver monstrance, made by Juan de Arfe (late 16th century), 3.25 meters high, which has an extensive iconographic program designed by Francisco Pacheco.
  • Alphonsine Tables, golden wooden relicary attributed to Juan de Toledo (S.XIII).
  • The vision of Saint Ignatius of Loyola, painting by Juan de Roelas (S.XVII).
  • The venerable Sister Francisca Dorotea, painting by Murillo (second half of the 17th century).
  • Piedad, painting by Juan de Núñez (third quarter S.XV).
  • The Virgin of Mercedes, painting by Juan de Roelas (pp. S.XVII)
  • San Fernando, sculpture by Pedro Roldán (second half of the 17th century).
  • Immaculate Conception, sculpture by Alonso Martínez (S.XVII).
  • Child Jesus, sculpture attributed to La Roldana (second half of the 17th century).
Capilla de San Andrés

Chapel of
Saint Andrew

The martyrdom of Saint Andrew, a copy of the original painting (early 17th century) by Juan de Roelas gives its name to the chapel.

The Gothic tombs from Toledo workshops from the beginning of the 15th century stand out, which accompany the marvelous carving of Christ of the Clemency made by Martínez Montañés (early XVII century).

Stained glass window: The Holy Supper by Arnao de Flanders (mid 16th century).

Capilla de los Dolores

Capilla de
Los Dolores

The tomb of Cardinal Marcelo Espínola (early 20th century) stands out, in the altarpiece a half-length image of the Virgin of Sorrows attributed to Pedro de Mena (17th century), a Crucified attributed to Juan Francisco Vázquez “the Old” (S. XVI) and the painting The betrothal of the Virgin and Saint Joseph made by Valdés Leal (mid 17th century). Through this chapel you can access the Sacristy of the Chalices.

Stained glass windows: Foot Washing of Arnao de Flandes (mid 16th century) and Cardenal Ilundain’s Coat of Arms (first half of the 20th century).

Altar de la Piedad

Altar of Piety or of the Holy Cross

Located to the left of the San Cristóbal gate. The altarpiece is the work of Alejo Fernández, the representation of The Pietà, is attributed to the same painter (first quarter of the 16th century).

Sacristia de los Calices

Sacristy of the Chalices

Several architects took part in its construction, which was completed by Martín de Gaínza (first half of the 16th century). Covered with a Gothic vault with ribs, it is a sampler of some of the best cathedral paintings.

Among the paintings stand out: The Adoration of the Kings by Alejo Fernández (early 16th century), The Calvary by Juan Núñez (late 15th century), The Virgin with the Child and Saint John the Baptist by Zurbarán (mid 17th century) , Lázaro with Saint Martha and Mary Magdalene by Valdés Leal (mid 17th century), The Glory by Juan de Roelas (early 17th century), The Circumcision by Jacob Jordaens (late 17th century) and The Saints Justa and Rufina by Francisco de Goya (early 19th century).

Covered with a Gothic vault with ribs, it is a sampler of some of the best cathedral paintings.

Altar de la Virgen Antigua

Capilla Virgen de la Antigua

In 1500, Cardinal Diego Hurtado de Mendoza ordered the original chapel to be enlarged for burial, since the great devotion that the Virgin of Antigua had among the Sevillians well deserved the largest chapel of those considered minor chapels. The fresco of the Virgin of Antigua, which presides over the marble altarpiece by José Fernández de Iglesias with sculptures by Pedro Duque Cornejo (half S.XVIII). There is a legend that explains the name of this Virgin but the reality she is not so old, she dates from the time when the mosque was used as a Christian temple (14th century).

The goldsmith’s crown was added in 1929 for her canonical coronation. The paintings, which iconographically represent the history of the Virgin of Antigua, as well as the saints and some landscapes, are works by Domingo Martínez (first half of the 18th century). Also noteworthy are the tombs of Cardinal Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, in Renaissance style, made by Doménico Fancelli (early 16th century) and that of Archbishop Luis Salcedo y Azcona, made by Pedro Duque Cornejo (mid 18th century) and inspired by the Renaissance one.

Stained glass windows: San Fernando, designed by José Gestoso (19th century).

Altar de la Concepción

Altar of the
Conception

To the right of the San Cristóbal gate. Chapel finished by Pedro Delgado (mid 16th century), where the main panel stands out with an Allegory of the Immaculate Conception, also known as the Genealogy of Christ, painted by Luis de Vargas (half 16th century).

The altar is also known as Altar of the Gamba (word that means leg in Italian) and which refers to the foreshortening of Adam’s leg in this work. Also note a clock by Fray José Cordero over the gate (late 18th century).

San Hermenegildo

Chapel of San Hermenegildo

In the center of the chapel, the tomb of Cardinal Juan de Cervantes in white alabaster, the work of Lorenzo Mercadante de Bretaña (half 15th century). The altarpiece is dominated by a sculpture of San Hermenegildo by Bartolomé García de Santiago (half 18th century). At the foot of the altarpiece, the sculptures of Santiago Peregrino carved in wood (mid 16th century) and Santiago el Menor in polychrome stone (early 16th century) stand out. Of the paintings in the chapel, we must point out an Immaculate Conception attributed to Juan de Roelas (17th century).

Stained glass windows: The Four Holy Bishops by Enrique Alemán (second half of the 15 century) and Attributes of San Hermenegildo by Francisco Gutiérrez (early 19th century).

Capilla de San José

Chapel of
Saint Joseph

In the center of the neoclassical altarpiece by Pedro de Arnal (late 18th century) the sculpture of Saint José by José Estévez (early 19th century). Among the paintings, the Betrothal of the Virgin and Saint Joseph by Valdés Leal (mid 17th century) stands out, on the altarpiece, and Baltasar’s dinner by Frans Francken II (17th century). Also note the tomb of Cardinal Bueno Monreal and the sculpture of Jesus tied to the column attributed to Francisco Ruiz Gijón (17th century).

Stained glass windows: San Gregory, San Agustín, San Augustine and San Jerome by Enrique Alemán (second half of the 15th century) and Adoration of the Shepherds, anonymous (first half of the 20th century).

Capilla de Santa Ana

Chapel of Saint Anne

The anonymous altarpiece that has several polychrome panels with varied iconography in a magnificent example of Sevillian Gothic (early 15th century). Opposite another altarpiece, made by Joaquín Bilbao (early 20th century) from which hangs the Christ of Maracaibo, a magnificent painting attributed to Villegas Marmolejo (half 16th century). Note the tomb of Cardinal Luis de la Lastra y Cuesta made by Ricardo Bellver (end of the 19th century) and the anonymous Flemish-style painting of Abraham and the three angels (17th century).

Stained glass windows: Santa Águeda, Santa Lucía, Santa Cecilia and Santa Inés by Enrique Alemán (second half of the 15th century) and La Sagrada Familia, anonymous (end of the 18th century).

Capilla San Laureano

Chapel of San Laurean

It was the first chapel to be completed in the new Cathedral. The solomonic altarpiece of anonymous carving (early 18th century), adapted to the vault, is presided over by the sculpture of Saint Laurean and iconographically traces the life of the saint. The paintings on the walls of Matías de Arteaga (early 18th century) also allude to his life. The tomb of Cardinal Joaquín Lluch belongs to Agapito Vallmitjana (late 19th century).

Stained glass windows: Saint Catherine, Saint Mary Magdalene, Saint Martha and Saint Margarita by Enrique Alemán (second half of the 15th century) and San Isidoro, San Laurean and San Leander by Vicente Menardo (end of the 16th century).

West side chapels and altars

The chapels of the Cathedral of Seville house countless treasures, anecdotes and stories that our guides explain in an entertaining and effective way. We present here a small structure of the chapels, with some essential information, that visitors will be able to see in our tours of the chapels. From left to right, facing the west wall, they meet.
Portada del Nacimiento

Altar of the Birth

Altarpiece with paintings, made by Luis de Vargas (mid 16th century), where the Adoration of the shepherds is the main painting.
Stained glass window next to the altar: The Annunciation by Vicente Menardo (half 16th century).

Virgen de la Cinta

Altar Virgin of the Ribbon

The small Baroque altarpiece (first quarter of the 17th century) houses La Virgen de la Cinta, attributed to Lorenzo Mercadante de Bretaña (second half of 15th century).

San Isidoro Catedral de Sevilla

Chapel of San Isidore

The ceiling and walls decorated with polychrome plasterwork stand out. Baroque altarpiece by Bernardo Simón de Pineda (half 17th century) with sculptures, including anonymous ones where Saint Isidore appears (early 18th century).

Virgen del Madroño

Altar Virgin of the Arbutus

Altarpiece where the Virgin of the Arbutus appears, attributed to Lorenzo Mercadante de Bretaña (second half of the 15th century) and topped by a painting with Christ tied to the column.
Ángel de la Guarda Catedral de Sevilla

Guardian Angel Altar

It is located in a small chapel under a Gothic gable and houses The Guardian Angel, a painting by Murillo (half 17th century) that arrived at the Cathedral at the beginning of the 19th century as a gift from the Capuchin monks of the city.
Virgen del Consuelo

Altar of the Consolation

The Virginof the Consolation, accompanied by Saint Anthony and James the Greater, is the work of Alonso Miguel de Tobar (first quarter of the 18th century). At the foot is the tomb of Diego López de Enciso, the patron of the altar.

Altar del Niño Mudo

Altar of the Mute Child

A carving of the Child Jesus presides over a small altarpiece, an anonymous carving (half 17th century) known as the Mute Child for his calm and serene attitude.
Altar de San Leandro

Chapel of San Leander

Under a decorative trefoil arch with baroque decoration made by Matías de Figueroa (first half of the 18th century) there is an altarpiece by Manuel Escobar (18th century) with sculptures by Pedro Duque Cornejo (first half of the 18th century), where the carving of San Leander stands out.
Altar de la Visitación

Altar of the Visitation

Altar with altarpiece and paintings by Pedro Villegas y Marmolejo (half 16th century), where the central painting representing The Visitation stands out. On the bench, a relief of Saint Jerome penitent by Jerónimo Hernández (half 16th century) and a portrait of the donor, Diego de Bolaños, with his relatives.

Stained glass window: At the door of Baptism, The Visitation by Vicente Menardo (half of the 16th century).

Altar de Nuestra Señora de la Alcobilla

Altar of Our Lady of Alcobilla

Anonymous baroque altarpiece (18th century) that is presided over by an anonymous sculpture in baked clay representing a Pietà (late 15th century), known as the Virgin of the Alcobilla.
Capillas de los Jacomes

Chapel of The Jacomes

Known as the Chapel of The Anguishes, it owes its name to the surname of the Marqueses de Tablantes, who were its patrons. With baroque plasterwork like the solomonic altarpiece (late 17th century) it has a painting of The Pietà by Juan de Roelas (early 17th century).

Stained glass windows: two anonymous circular stained glass windows with the coat of arms of the Cathedral Chapter (second half of the 18th century).

North side chapels and altars

The chapels of the Cathedral of Seville house countless treasures, anecdotes and stories that our guides explain in an entertaining and effective way. We expose here a small structure of the chapels, with some essential data, that visitors will be able to see in our tours of the chapels. From left to right, facing the north wall.
La Capilla de las Escalas

Chapel of Bishop Scalas

The center of the marble altarpiece is occupied by a relief with The Coming of the Holy Spirit, anonymously carved (first half of the 16th century). Here is the tomb of Bishop Baltasar del Río (early 16th century), Bishop Scalas, although his remains are buried in Rome. Also worth noting, among other works, is The Virgin of the Pomegranade, an anonymous glazed baked clay relief (15th century) and a painting of The Holy Family by Juan Ruiz Soriano (half 18th century).

Stained glass windows: St. Jude Thaddeus, St. James the Less, St. Philip and St. James the Greater by Enrique Alemán (late 15th century) and The Descent of the Holy Spirit made in Munich (19th century).

Capilla de San Antonio

Chapel of Saint Anthony

Under a molding carved by Bernardo Simón de Pineda (17th century) is located the enormous painting The Vision of Saint Anthony by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (half of the 17th century) is one of his great works. This painting has the anecdote that a part of canvas was stolen in 19th century and bought in New York by an antique dealer who returned it to the Cathedral. In the center there is an anonymous Baptismal Font in Renaissance style (16th century). Of the rest of the paintings stands out, in the attic of the altarpiece, The Baptism of Christ, also a work of Murillo (third quarter 17th century).

Stained glass windows: The four Evangelists by Enrique Alemán (second half of the 15th century) and Saints Justa and Rufina and the Vision of Saint Anthony by Juan Bautista León (late 17th century).

Next to the door of the Tabernacle: St. John the Evangelist, St. Michael, St. John the Baptist and St. Gabriel by Enrique Alemán (late 15th century).

Capilla de Santiago Catedral de Sevilla

Chapel of Santiago

The altarpiece by Bernardo Simón de Pineda (half 17th century) presides over a monumental painting depicting Santiago at the Battle of Clavijo, by Juan de Roelas (early17th century). The top of the altarpiece is occupied by the Martirio de San Lorenzo, a painting by Valdés Leal (mid 17th century). The rest of the works include the Virgin of the Cushion, anonymous relief in glazed baked clay (15th century); the Creation of Adam, painting by Cornelis de Vos (half 17th century) and the tomb of Archbishop Gonzalo de Mena, anonymous Gothic-style sarcophagus (early 15th century).

Stained glass windows: St. Justa, St. Rufina, Santiago the Greater and St Barbara by Enrique Alemán (late 15th century) and The Conversion of Saint Paul by Vicente Menardo (half 16th century).

Señora del Belén Catedral de Sevilla

Altar Our Lady of Bethlehem

The baroque altarpiece by Jerónimo Franco (half S.XVII) presides over a painting by Alonso Cano that represents the Virgin of Bethlehem (first half 17th century). It is finished off by The Holy Trinity by Virgilio Mattoni (early 20th century).
San Francisco en la Catedral de Sevilla

Chapel of
Saint Francis

The ecstasy of Saint Francis by Francisco Herrera El Mozo (half XVII century) and The imposition of the chasuble of San Ildefonso de Valdés Leal (half XVII century) are the main paintings of the altarpiece by Bernardo Simón de Pineda (half XVII century ). Of the rest of the works, an anonymous Ecce Homo placed in an urn (late 17th century) and a painting by Frans Francken II representing The Fall of Saint Paul (17th century) stand out.

Stained glass windows: St. Anthony of Padua, St. Bernardine of Siena, St. Francis of Assisi and St. Louis of Toulouse by Enrique Alemán (late XV century) and Saint Francis receiving the stigmata by Arnao de Flandes (half XV century).

Altar de la Asunción

Altar of the
Assumption

Sponsored by Juan Cristóbal de la Puebla (early 16th century) it has a small baroque altarpiece (early 18th century) with a painting of The Assumption attributed to the Genoese School (end of the 17th century).
Altar de las Doncellas

Chapel of
the Maidens

Founded at the beginning of the 16th century by Micer García de Gibraleón for his burial and as the headquarters of the brotherhood of poor marriageable maidens, so that they would have a dowry. Baroque altarpiece by José Rivera (18th century) that presides over the Annunciation and is accompanied by paintings from the 15th, 16th and 18th centuries. Stands out for its beauty, the Renaissance grille (third quarter 16th century).

Stained glass windows: St. Magdalene anointing the Lord’s feet by Arnao de Flandes (half 16th century) and, divided into two, The Virgin of Mercy and The Annunciation by Arnao de Vergara (first half 16th century).

Capilla Evangelistas

Chapel of the
Evangelists

The patron saint and archdeacon of Écija, Rodrigo de Santillán, commissioned Hernando de Esturmio to create the altarpiece with nine panels, including The Mass of Saint Gregory and The Resurrection (first half of the 16th century). The rest of the paintings are a varied saint list of Murillesque and Flemish influence.

Stained glass windows: The Resurrection of St Lazarus and The Birth of Christ, both made by Arnao de Flanders (half 16th century).

Capilla Virgen del Pilar

Virgin of the
 Pillar Chapel

Located in the lobby of the Lizard Gate, it has belonged to the Pinelo family since the 16th century. The most remarkable thing is The Virgin of the Pillar by Pedro Millán made in fired clay (early XVI century) that presides over the baroque altar (late 17th century) and is flanked by the wooden carvings of Saint Peter and Saint Paul.

Stained glass window: Sacred Entry into Jerusalem topped by Allegory of Charity by Arnao de Flandes (half 16th century).

Discover the secrets of the Cathedral of Seville

Visit its history, its doors, its altars and its works of art.
With our tour you will discover in detail one of the most beautiful places in the world.

With ten access doors and a rectangular floor plan, it is a model of the Cathedral that influenced many Novohispanic cathedrals after the conquest of the New World.

Our tours will show the wealth of paintings, sculptures, stained glass windows, forging, goldsmithing, clothing, books, etc., that make Seville Cathedral one of the great museums in Europe and a historical-artistic compendium of Catholicism.

Discover the history of the Cathedral of Seville through the centuries and the different historical periods through which it has passed, from the Almohad to the present.

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